Browsing the "Blog" Category

The Palaeocast blog is where we let palaeontologists around the world their their own stories in their own voice. If you’re interested in writing your own article for the Palaeocast blog, please get in touch via the contact form. The link is at the foot of every page.

Blog

New Oviraptorid Shows Cassowary Convergence

Published on July 29th, 2017 | by Chris Barker

The Late Cretaceous rocks of Ganzhou, China, are rife with oviraptorids. We have seen these strange theropods before here at Palaeocast, when we looked at the very high temperatures at which they incubated their eggs. The [&hellip... Read More


Blog

Need for Speed: Cretaceous Drift 

Published on July 18th, 2017 | by Guest Blogger

 “Must go faster!” yells Dr Ian Malcolm, as his mangled, yet rather toned, body was hauled away in the Jurassic Park jeep, his lovely hair swaying in the wind as they fled from the Tyrannosaur paddock, [&hellip... Read More


Blog

Oxygen Isotopes and Oviraptorosaurs

Published on July 7th, 2017 | by Guest Blogger

Implications for Dinosaur Nesting Behaviour and Thermophysiology Oviraptorosaurs had received a pretty bad reputation when they first popped onto the scene. Initially, palaeontologists branded these creatures as “egg plunderers”, due to the discovery of an individual, [&hellip... Read More


Blog

The Significance of the Flocculus in Archosauria

Published on June 26th, 2017 | by Guest Blogger

With advancements in computed tomography (CT) scanning comes an increased understanding of the internal structures preserved in extant and extinct animals, providing a non-destructive way of peering into the bones and revealing their secrets. Along with [&hellip... Read More


Blog

Is the Tully Monster a Vertebrate after all?

Published on February 20th, 2017 | by David Marshall

Tullimonstrum gregarium, the ‘Tully Monster’, is an enigmatic fossil from the Late Carboniferous Mazon Creek lagerstätte, Illinois, USA. This soft-bodied animal is instantly recognisable by its ‘torpedo-shaped’ body ending in a tail; its long, elbowed, proboscis [&hellip... Read More


Blog

Life, molecules and the geological record

Published on February 17th, 2017 | by Guest Blogger

To understand the evolution of life, palaeontologists can employ a variety of techniques. This typically involves the visual identification of fossils, like bones or teeth, within the sedimentary record, either by eye or using a microscope. [&hellip... Read More


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