Browsing the "Mesozoic" Category

The Mesozoic era, meaning “middle life”, is a division of earth’s history spanning from around 252 to 66 million years ago. It is subdivided into the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. The beginning of the Mesozoic is characterised by a long phase of recovery following the end Permian mass extinction. The end of the Mesozoic is marked by the Cretaceous/Paleogene extinction event which wiped out the dinosaurs among other groups.

Cretaceous

Episode 82: Dinosaurs of China

Published on October 17th, 2017 | by David Marshall

‘Dinosaurs of China’ at Wollaton Hall, Nottingham, UK,  is a one-time only world exclusive exhibition of dinosaurs. Featuring fossils and specimens never before seen outside of Asia, the collection brings to life the story of how [&hellip... Read More


Cretaceous

Episode 81: Coccolithophores

Published on October 1st, 2017 | by David Marshall

Coccolithophores are tiny unicellular eukaryotic phytoplankton (algae). Each is covered with even smaller calcium carbonate plates called coccoliths and it is these that are commonly preserved in the fossil record. In fact, coccoliths are so small, [&hellip... Read More


Blog

Evidence of Intense Predation Pressures on Ancient Megafauna

Published on August 4th, 2017 | by Chris Barker

Biology is full of exciting avenues, and some of the finest, in my opinion, are the morphological and behavioural adaptations that define the split seconds whether an animal lives or dies, eats or starves. Predator-prey interactions [&hellip... Read More


Blog

Playing Doctor with Titanosaurs

Published on July 30th, 2017 | by Chris Barker

Titanosaurs include some of the largest terrestrial organisms to walk the Earth: globally distributed, multi-tonne behemoths representing the last of the sauropods at the end Cretaceous extinction event. Much about their biology is known, ranging from [&hellip... Read More


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New Oviraptorid Shows Cassowary Convergence

Published on July 29th, 2017 | by Chris Barker

The Late Cretaceous rocks of Ganzhou, China, are rife with oviraptorids. We have seen these strange theropods before here at Palaeocast, when we looked at the very high temperatures at which they incubated their eggs. The [&hellip... Read More


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Need for Speed: Cretaceous Drift 

Published on July 18th, 2017 | by Guest Blogger

 “Must go faster!” yells Dr Ian Malcolm, as his mangled, yet rather toned, body was hauled away in the Jurassic Park jeep, his lovely hair swaying in the wind as they fled from the Tyrannosaur paddock, [&hellip... Read More


Blog

Oxygen Isotopes and Oviraptorosaurs

Published on July 7th, 2017 | by Guest Blogger

Implications for Dinosaur Nesting Behaviour and Thermophysiology Oviraptorosaurs had received a pretty bad reputation when they first popped onto the scene. Initially, palaeontologists branded these creatures as “egg plunderers”, due to the discovery of an individual, [&hellip... Read More


Cenozoic

Episode 78: Japanese Palaeontology

Published on June 30th, 2017 | by Liz Martin-Silverstone

When thinking of palaeontology in Asia, most people think of Mongolia and China, but there is actually a significant palaeontology community in Japan. Japan has many fossils, starting in the Ordovician, and ranging from everything from [&hellip... Read More


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