Cretaceous

Published on October 1st, 2016 | by Liz Martin-Silverstone

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Episode 70: The Golden Age of Dinosaur Discovery

The last 10 years has shown a large increase in the number of new species and new discoveries of dinosaurs, as well as the number of papers written. It seems that almost every week there is a new species or significant find in the news. Why is that? Is this likely to continue? What can we expect for the next 10 years?

We sat down with Dr. David Evans, Temerity Chair in Palaeontology at the Royal Ontario Museum and Associate Professor at the University of Toronto to talk about this so-called ‘Golden Age of Dinosaur Discovery’. Dr. Evans is a well known dinosaur palaeontologist who has worked on many groups all over the world, focusing particularly in southern Alberta and the US.

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Mapping a tyrannosaur quarry in the Milk River badlands of southern Alberta. Credit: David Evans.

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The Wendiceratops quarry in the Milk River badlands, southern Alberta. Credit: David Evans.

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University of Toronto undergraduates excavating at the Wendiceratops quarry. Credit: David Evans.

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Michael J Ryan (left) and David Evans (right) at the Wendiceratops quarry. Credit: Derek Larson.

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Frill bones of the ceratopsian Wendiceratops after preparation. Credit: David Evans.

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Life restoration of Wendiceratops by palaeoartist Danielle Dufault. Credit: Royal Ontario Museum.

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Wendy Sloboda standing in front of a reconstructed skeleton of Wendiceratops. Credit: David Evans.

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Articulated skeleton of a crested duck-billed dinosaur during excavation near Onefour, Alberta. Credit: David Evans.

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A large tooth of the tyrannosaur Daspletosaurus. Credit: Royal Ontario Museum.

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Life restoration of the pachycephalosaurid Acrotholus audeti. Credit: Julius Csotonyi.

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Articulated ribcage of a duck-billed ‘mummy’, draped in fossil skin, near Onefour, Alberta. Credit: David Evans.

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David Evans excavating a crocodyliform skull in the Sahara of northern Sudan. Credit: Johannes Muller.

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